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20130115
20130123
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
set our country on a path that will allow us to get our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and septemberer all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they allr today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have you nan hit in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do some
on the achievements made in the first term and he looks at this in a broadway because this isn't deficit reduction, for example, is not a goal onto itself. we pursue it in order to help the economy and help create jobs. otherwise it's not worth the effort, in his mind. >> mike pence delivers his first state of the state address tonight. we'll have that live for you at 7:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. tomorrow, secretary of state hillary clinton testifies on capitol hill on the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. first up, she's before the senate foreign relations committee. that's live at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. then, in the afternoon the secretary before the house foreign affairs committee. that's set to get under way at 2:00 p.m. eastern. again, both of those hearings live on c-span3. also, c-span.org tomorrow. also tomorrow, the house will postpone a decision, will debate a bill postponing on raising the nation's debt ceiling. you saw pete sessions, the rules committee chairman, filing that rule on the house floor a moment ago. they met this afternoon to discuss the flan whi
. this would give the right signals on energy sources and use. it could raise money to reduce the deficit, restore our infrastructure, speed and finance conservation. there are a number of other commonsense steps that would make progress on carbon pollution and energy conservation goals more significant. the epa should stop dragging its feet permitting old coal plants to continue to spew forth toxic waste, harming the environment and the health of our citizens. it is past time the clean air act reinforced. make sure there are proper safeguards for the cracking technology. make sure this reservoir of inexpensive gas does not undercut the addition of renewables to our energy portfolio. solar, wind, geothermal. dership on these technologies for a balanced energy portfolio and ultimately to reduce our carbon footprint. at each step, we should be looking to enhance energy conservation, because the cheapest kilowatt hour is one that you don't have to generate. we should have a 10-year glide path in support of renewable energy. the wind energy industry has already signaled its reaccept tift just
, we understand what's going on in the debt and deficit and destruction but we have a bunch of debt deniers right now other in the senate that, look, this -- this debt devastate -- devastation that's coming is coming. do we have an obligation to try to find a way to actually get a piece of legislation all the way to the president's desk where we get to start to bend the curve? something beyond the messaging bill to actually an accomplishment. and that's -- and that's going to be the battle. >> you asked if this is a test of the relevance of the conservatives in the conference. i would say that really, most conservatives are willing to suspend disbelief and trust the leadership right now that we'll have a conservative outcome after the last three months. it's really a test of this new pact, if you will, of leadership to get to a 10-year balanced budget, to hold the c.r. at 974. we'll see if those things come to pass. i certainly hope they do. but i would submit to you it's more of a test of what the leadership is going to do than it is of the conservative element. >> i would say it's
can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. simply put, the president got his tax increases in the last congress. it's time for this congress to tackle washington's spending bing. i'd like to recognize the gentlelady from indiana. >> mr. chairman, my message otoday is simple. on too many big items, congress has been kicking the can down the road for years. it's time to supply real leadership on the most pressing challenges we face. this is the only way we can restore trust in congress. we're fast approaching a dead end. the social security trust fund will be bankrupt in 20 years. medicare and medicaid are not on a sustainable path. it is wrong for us to make proppingses to the american people we know we cannot keep. ms. brooks: we must address the drivers of our debt, medicare, medicaid, an social security. not because these programs don't have merit and certainly not because seniors currently benefiting from them don't deserve with they've been promised. because real leadership isn't about making the easy choice, it's about maybing the right choice. social
would be able to reduce the deficit by $150 billion. not a bad idea. and then if you could do all this and would only cost the average driver less than $1 per week per car, would that be a reasonable burden to impose? so i'm floating the idea. we are beginning discussions with senator mark warner of virginia. he was part of the gang of six, gang of eight. we are encouraged by what we're hearing from him. chairman bill shuster in the house came to our meeting in pittsburgh in november, and he said, listen, folks, we know that the central question congress will have to address next year is revenue. we are open to ideas. no guarantee that they can pass anything. but bill shuster is open to any and all ideas. so what i'm asking you to do is to join us in the battle that lies ahead this next couple of years and demand that congress provide long-term funding for transportation. you know, the big issue that every member of congress is concerned about is with deficits, long-term fiscal viability of the country and cutting spending and raising revenue, that combination is what people seem
reduced the federal deficit even by a dollar. we are not going to get out of this overnight. this would allow us to keep reducing the deficits. we have a shared value in eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse. we are intent on that. host: how much of the budget does waste, fraud, and abuse make up? guest: i could go back to virginia beach, virginia, and we could identify waste every day. we will never eliminate it entirely. we can do a better job. it will take reforms. we are living longer and we have fewer people paying in. i want to protect those who are hurting the most, like art, who called in earlier. host: lester is a republican. caller: good morning. disability, 63 years old. my wife still works. $45,000 a less taw less than year. somehow someone is going to have to do something about this. guest: i agree completely. i believe it is immoral for one generation to pass on debt that dims their future. those who have served our country -- i am mindful of the price paid by our goldstar families. we're failing the young people. i am with you. i was over it. i believe when americans are gi
in the late 1980's when we didn't have to talk about how to pay for disaster assistance because the deficit was only $3 trillion. but we've so badly mismanaged our money after that, by the time we got to hurricane katrina in 2005, that we actually did start talking about offsetting and paying for disaster relief and paid for and offset about 40% of it. but we didn't learn. we didn't learn from those mistakes and we've continued to mismanage our money and to run up our deficit to such a point now where we're at $16 trillion today and it's incumbent upon us to have the discussion about whether or not we have the money to do this. and whether or not it's important enough to us to pay for it. i wish very much that we weren't here today. i wish very much that we could pass this and easily borrow the money, without any questions whatsoever. but we've wasted that opportunity. we've mismanaged our own finances to the point where we are now no longer capable of taking care of our own. think about that for a second. in the united states of america we do not have enough money to take care of our own c
budget deficit and debt, the committee sees that the budget deficit will continue to decline over the next two years. but we do not characterize the debt and deficit at unsustainably high levels. we do think the deficit is reduced to $925 billion in 2013 and narrowed further, to $728 billion in 2014. that is down from $1.1 trillion last year. that gives you an overview of the committee consensus opinion and i would be happy to answer any additional questions you might how about the committee's outlook. i will be happy to entertain other questions as well. yes? >> just to clarify a little bit on the gdp dragon on the tax hike, was that on the payroll and income tax increases? >> that is correct. >> the 1.25% dragon, was out for the whole year? -- the 1.25% drag, was that for the whole year? >> we think it will be for the whole year of fiscal 2013. >> with the labour market and some improvement on as quick as it was, without just -- there was some sentiment that it might be slowing down. >> we are seeing drags on consumer spending, but also from the ongoing recession in europe and j
to prioritize the government's bills. what's wrong with that idea? guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake deficit reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills do you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a deadbeat nation really, and i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know, if i might say so, if not firsthand, secondhand, much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, not all of it, i think some realizes the potential consequences. host: if
of the lines of the deficit and the mention of newtown and other issues, but notably on immigration reform, he just sort of sat there while other members did applaud. whether or not you can read something into that, i am not sure, but it is definitely an opportunity for reaction on the other side. host: to all of these issues we have been addressing the last hour, i want to look at something your colleague wrote in "the washington post." "if the president can reach a broad deal that settles some of the disputes over entitlement spending and tax code and govgiving the government borrowing authority to last through much of the term, he can use that energy to forge a bipartisan, rise on these other big issues to." guest: that is a huge point. one point that ms. mcconnell, republican leader in the senate, has made over and over again is the reason they are using to get them as leverage is they feel the urgency of the issue, and one of the things he said in the past few weeks was that if obama does come to the table and helps to craft a big deal, both sides can agree to, he will be able to move on
a fifth year in a row where we are going to have a deficit exceeding a trillion dollars a year. that's the greatest threat to the middle class in america and we are committed to trying to address that problem. that's one of the reasons why i voted against the fiscal cliff deal. the president called for a balanced approach. i think his approach raising taxes is not the way to grow our economy. nonetheless, he indicated there would be spending cuts. there were not. in fact there were spending increases in that bill. host: fix boxer's original assault gun ban. echoing a recent poll that said 30% of those polled are dissatisfied with gun laws, want to see them strengthened. not specific gun laws but, you know, saying we need to reinstitute the assault weapons ban and fix it. guest: well, the evidence -- again, we are certainly willing to listen to proposals that are offered by the president and his commission and by others, but the original assault weapons ban was not a meaningful law because it did not distinguish between the so-called assault weapon and other types of firearms that fir
and the size of our deficit. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future.(applause) our past, when twilight years were spent in poverty and parents of a child with a disability had nowhere to turn. we do not believe that in this country freedom is reserved for the lucky, or happiness for the few. responsibly we live our lives, any one of us at any time may face a job loss, or a sudden illness, or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not sap our initiative, they strengthen us. (applause) they do not make us a nation of takers; they free us to take the risks that make this country great. (applause) we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to ourselves, but to all posterity. we will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. (applause) so
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)